Peering into massive semi-truck engines, ducking beneath wheel wells and examining tail lights, students at Boone County Truck Driving School slowly worked through their first pre-trip inspection, huddling together in small groups against the chilly mountain air.
Peering into massive semi-truck engines, ducking beneath wheel wells and examining tail lights, students at Boone County Truck Driving School slowly worked through their first pre-trip inspection, huddling together in small groups against the chilly mountain air.
Ian Heaton was a black belt Tae Kwon Do instructor who played baseball, soccer and lacrosse as a sophomore at Bethesda-Chevy Chase High School in Bethesda, Md. “I did not appreciate what a great life I was living,” Heaton, now 18, said in March testimony before Congress. “It was over in a split second.”
Fast forward 238 years since the founding of U.S. democracy, and it continues to survive through the efforts of presidents past. But the office has evolved from what George Washington had in mind.
 
 
 

Tourists get Capitol Hill to themselves as Hurricane Sandy approaches

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Click on photo to enlarge or download: Tony Nolan, left, tipped his umbrella to shelter his wife, Beth Nolan, from the rain in front of the Supreme Court Monday. The Boston couple was in Washington to watch a friend run the Marine Corps Marathon on Sunday and were stranded when their flight home was canceled. The couple, both lawyers, spent Monday morning watching the Supreme Court arguments. SHFWire photo by Matt NelsonClick on photo to enlarge or download: Tony Nolan, left, tipped his umbrella to shelter his wife, Beth Nolan, from the rain in front of the Supreme Court Monday. The Boston couple was in Washington to watch a friend run the Marine Corps Marathon on Sunday and were stranded when their flight home was canceled. The couple, both lawyers, spent Monday morning watching the Supreme Court arguments. SHFWire photo by Matt NelsonWASHINGTON — Even after they had been stranded in Washington by Hurricane Sandy and had no idea when they would be able to leave, Tony and Beth Nolan were all smiles early Monday afternoon.

Both are Boston lawyers, and they took advantage of their D.C. downtime to see arguments at the Supreme Court without an appointment.

"We got in!" Tony Nolan said. "It was a great copyright argument."

The couple heard arguments in Kirtsaeng v. John Wiley & Sons in the Supreme Court, one of the only buildings with any life around it Monday. The court announced it would close on Tuesday.

The federal government was closed, in preparation for the incoming hurricane. Most of the sidewalks on the Hill were empty, but a handful of tourists occasionally braved the weather to snap photographs in the rain. Besides police officers, the only other city workers were two men in bright yellow rain suits cleaning leaves from the drains.

The Nolans didn't stay long once the arguments had finished, heading back to a drier location to try to figure out when flights might resume and they could leave the city.

"We rescheduled for tomorrow at 10:30, but that one's probably going to get canceled," Tony Nolan said. "I don't know when we are going to get out."

Reach reporter Matt Nelson at matt.nelson@shns.com or 202-408-2735. SHFWire stories are free to any news organization that gives the reporter a byline and credits the SHFWire.

Click on photo to enlarge or download: Two city workers carefully clean the drains outside of the U.S. Capitol shortly after noon on Monday. The workers were trying to keep leaves from clogging the drains as Hurricane Sandy approached. SHFWire photo by Matt NelsonClick on photo to enlarge or download: Two city workers carefully clean the drains outside of the U.S. Capitol shortly after noon on Monday. The workers were trying to keep leaves from clogging the drains as Hurricane Sandy approached. SHFWire photo by Matt Nelson

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