Peering into massive semi-truck engines, ducking beneath wheel wells and examining tail lights, students at Boone County Truck Driving School slowly worked through their first pre-trip inspection, huddling together in small groups against the chilly mountain air.
Peering into massive semi-truck engines, ducking beneath wheel wells and examining tail lights, students at Boone County Truck Driving School slowly worked through their first pre-trip inspection, huddling together in small groups against the chilly mountain air.
Ian Heaton was a black belt Tae Kwon Do instructor who played baseball, soccer and lacrosse as a sophomore at Bethesda-Chevy Chase High School in Bethesda, Md. “I did not appreciate what a great life I was living,” Heaton, now 18, said in March testimony before Congress. “It was over in a split second.”
Fast forward 238 years since the founding of U.S. democracy, and it continues to survive through the efforts of presidents past. But the office has evolved from what George Washington had in mind.
 
 
 

Ian Kullgren - Spring 2013

Ian Kullgren is a junior at Michigan State University in East Lansing, Mich., where he is double majoring in social policy and journalism. He spent the last year covering the 2012 election, where he followed the Republican primary race in Michigan’s 6th Congressional District for MLive Media Group. For a year before that, he was a member of the Michigan capitol press corps for MSU’s State News, where he covered Michigan Gov. Rick Snyder and the state legislature. He also reported on the GOP presidential primary race in Michigan, covering Mitt Romney’s election-night event and a televised CNBC debate. He interviewed former contenders Rick Santorum and Ron Paul. In August he attended the Republican National Convention, writing about Romney’s keynote speech and Michigan delegation events.

Ian, who grew up in Midland, Mich., enjoys wading through campaign finance reports, both on and off the job.

He is excited and grateful for the opportunity to finally live and report in Washington.

Despite culture change, gay members of Congress still rare

 

WASHINGTON – As a Rhode Island state representative, Rep. David Cicilline never tried to hide that he was gay. So when a newspaper columnist asked him about it during his first run for Congress in 2002, he answered honestly.

Budget cuts could give ammunition to foreign spies, officials warn

 

WASHINGTON – The main discussion about sequestration weakening national security has centered on cuts to the military, but government and industry officials are warning that the cuts could have another unforeseen threat: foreign spying.

Republicans seek to chip away health-care overhaul

 

WASHINGTON – Their sights might be lowered, but they haven’t surrendered.

GOP seeks to close success gap, cut short presidential primary

WASHINGTON – In 2010, New Mexico elected Republican Susanna Martinez as the state’s first female governor. But in 2012, President Barack Obama won her state with almost 53 percent of the vote.

Hidden from view, offerings at Vietnam Memorial reveal nation’s loss

Click on photo to enlarge or download: Bruce Wolff, 14, of Canton, Ohio, kneels for a closer look at items left at the Vietnam Veterans Memorial wall. More than 400,000 items have been left since the wall opened in 1982. SHFWire photo by Ian KullgrenClick on photo to enlarge or download: Bruce Wolff, 14, of Canton, Ohio, kneels for a closer look at items left at the Vietnam Veterans Memorial wall. More than 400,000 items have been left since the wall opened in 1982. SHFWire photo by Ian KullgrenWASHINGTON – Duery Felton doesn’t go looking for things.

Conservative Supreme Court justices skeptical of Voting Rights Act section

Click on photo to enlarge or download: The Rev. Al Sharpton, left, speaks to protesters outside the Supreme Court alongside The Rev. Jesse Jackson on Wednesday. The NAACP and other civil rights groups fear the repeal of Section 5 of the 1965 Voting Rights Act would undo decades of racial inclusion measures at the polls. SHFWire photo by Ian KullgrenClick on photo to enlarge or download: The Rev. Al Sharpton, left, speaks to protesters outside the Supreme Court alongside The Rev. Jesse Jackson on Wednesday. The NAACP and other civil rights groups fear the repeal of Section 5 of the 1965 Voting Rights Act would undo decades of racial inclusion measures at the polls. SHFWire photo by Ian Kullgren

WASHINGTON - A key section of the historic Voting Rights Act might not exist for the 2014 midterm election, as a conservative-leaning majority of the Supreme Court doubted its validity during oral arguments Wednesday.

Supreme Court to hear Voting Rights Act case

WASHINGTON – A Supreme Court case set to be argued Wednesday is rehashing a 150-year-old civil rights debate in the South, once again bringing into play the contentious balance between racial equality and states’ rights.

Federal cuts could affect soldiers, workers at Fort Bliss

 Click on photo to enlarge or download: Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff Martin Dempsey and other military leaders say local military bases could feel harsh effects if the sequestration budget cuts go into effect next week. SHFWire photo by Eddie AmehClick on photo to enlarge or download: Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff Martin Dempsey and other military leaders say local military bases could feel harsh effects if the sequestration budget cuts go into effect next week. SHFWire photo by Eddie AmehWASHINGTON – Come next month, thousands of soldiers and civilian workers at El Paso’s Fort Bliss might have to weather fallout from the ongoing federal debt dispute.

Contingency plan protects presidency, some point to flaws

WASHINGTON – When Dan Glickman realized he had launch codes for enough nuclear weapons to destroy the world, he remembers feeling more thoughtful than afraid.

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